The Society of Biblical Literature was founded in 1880 to foster biblical scholarship.
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About SBL

The Society of Biblical Literature is the oldest and largest international scholarly membership organization in the field of biblical studies. Founded in 1880, the Society has grown to over 8,500 international members including teachers, students, religious leaders and individuals from all walks of life who share a mutual interest in the critical investigation of the Bible.
Congresses

2013 International Meeting

St. Andrews, Scotland

Meeting Begins: 7/7/2013
Meeting Ends: 7/11/2013

Call For Papers Opens: 10/15/2012
Call For Papers Closes: 2/12/2013
Requirements for Participation

Program Units

 

Ancient Near East

Jacob L. Wright
Description: The ancient Near East section explores the texts and material culture of the ancient world, especially Egypt, the Levant, Anatolia, and Mesopotamia from the birth of writing through the Hellenistic period. Our aim is to study the ancient world with a variety of methods and from a variety of perspectives—anthropological, archaeological, art-historical, economic, legal, literary, philological, sociohistorical, etc. We welcome work that reads the literature or material culture of one region against another, as well as work that is more limited in scope. Each year, we anticipate hosting two panels: one devoted to any aspect of the study of the ancient Near East, and one focussing on a more narrowly defined theme, region, approach, or time period.

Call for papers: The ancient Near East section explores the texts and material culture of the ancient world, especially Egypt, the Levant, Anatolia, and Mesopotamia from the birth of writing through the Hellenistic period. Our aim is to study the ancient world with a variety of methods and from a variety of perspectives—anthropological, archaeological, art-historical, economic, legal, literary, philological, sociohistorical, etc. We welcome work that reads the literature or material culture of one region against another, as well as work that is more limited in scope. Each year, we anticipate hosting two panels: one devoted to any aspect of the study of the ancient Near East, and one focussing on a more narrowly defined theme, region, approach, or time period.

Ancient Near Eastern Iconography and the Bible

Joel M. LeMon
Izaak J. de Hulster
Description: This section, formerly titled Iconography and the Bible, examines the ways that ancient pictorial material informs interpretations of biblical texts and vice-versa. We welcome papers that explore the relationships between iconographic and textual materials as well as papers that deal exclusively with iconographic issues.

Call for papers: For the meeting in St. Andrews, the Ancient Near Eastern Iconography and the Bible program unit will hold two sessions.
  • The first session is an open one, in which we welcome proposals on the full range of iconographic approaches.
  • In addition to our open session, we will convene a special session on the topic of Egyptianizing elements in the iconography of Ancient Israel/Palestine. We welcome proposal that explore the relationship between Egypt and Israel/Palestine as represented in both iconography and text.

Apocalyptic Literature

Anathea Portier-Young
Description: The Apocalyptic Literature Section provides the International Meeting’s only general forum for studies related to apocalyptic literature. The Section welcomes papers that engage the wide range of apocalyptic texts, that provide analysis of the history and conventions of apocalyptic literature, and that employ diverse methodological perspectives.

Call for papers: The Apocalyptic Literature Unit will hold an invited panel on "Ancient Jewish Apocalyptic Texts and Traditions in the Slavonic Milieux". In addition, we invite papers in the following areas: 1) We invite papers on all aspects of the study of ancient apocalyptic literature, using diverse methodologies. In celebration of our host institution, we encourage proposals that engage the legacy of scholars whose work at the University of St. Andrews has made significant contributions to the study of ancient apocalyptic literature, including Matthew Black and Richard Bauckham. We also encourage proposals that explore apocalyptic texts from interpretive perspectives that have been traditionally under-represented in the academy, including African, African-American, Asian, Asian-American, Latina/o, Pacific Islander, and Post-colonial hermeneutical approaches. 2) We invite proposals on spatial dimensions of apocalyptic literature, with particular attention to the construction of imagined spaces and boundaries and the relation between apocalyptic spaces and particular places. 3) The Apocalyptic Literature Unit and Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha Unit invite proposals for a Joint Session on “Heavenly Bodies.” This session is a continuation of our shared work on the theme of “bodies” as we examined “Monstrous Bodies, Gigantic Bodies” in 2012. We invite papers using diverse methodologies on the subject of God's body or bodies as well as those of angels, spirits, stars, planets, and other celestial beings in ancient Jewish apocalyptic literature, apocrypha, and pseudepigrapha.

Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha

Kelley N. Coblentz Bautch
Tobias Nicklas
Description: The Section fosters ongoing study of extra-canonical texts, as subjects of literary and philological investigation; as evidence for the history of religion, theology, and cult practice; and as documents of the socio-symbolic construction of traditions along lines of class and gender.

Call for papers: The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha Section is pleased to announce our Call for Papers for the 2013 meeting at St. Andrews. For this year’s meeting we feature four sessions. 1) The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha Section solicits papers that take up the theme “Lived Religious Experience and the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha.” Papers could examine, for example, how apocryphal, deuterocanonical and pseudepigraphal texts have been engaged liturgically or textually or utilized by a distinct community or within a particular context. 2) This section also hosts an open session for scholars who are undertaking critical work and new projects that are sufficiently developed. Presenters should be prepared to complement their presentations with a handout or medium that demonstrates a clear thesis, control of the text and classical languages, and solid argumentation. 3) The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha Section hosts a Joint Session with the Apocalyptic Literature Section on the theme of “Heavenly Bodies, Celestial Bodies,” a continuation of these sections’ work on the theme of “bodies.” We invite papers using diverse methodologies on the subject of God's body or bodies as well as those of angels, spirits, stars, planets, and other celestial beings in ancient Jewish apocalyptic literature, Apocrypha, and Pseudepigrapha. 4) The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha section is hosting an invited session that celebrates the publication of Old Testament Pseudepigrapha: More Noncanonical Scriptures (Eerdmans), the first volume of texts translated under the auspices of the More Old Testament Pseudepigrapha Project at the University of St Andrews. A panel of contributors to the volume discusses aspects of the new collection and its contribution to biblical studies and cognate disciplines.

Apostolic Fathers and Related Early Christian Literature

Paul A. Hartog
Taras Khomych
Description: This unit fosters academic discourse focused upon the “Apostolic Fathers” and supplemental literature, as transmitters of earlier traditions; as reflections of theology, ethics, and worship; as means of identity and community formation; and as subjects of literary and social-theory investigations.

Call for papers: Th Apostolic Fathers consultation has arranged a session with four invited papers to be presented in 2013. The four presentations will employ a variety of approaches and methodologies to examine the Martyrdom of Polycarp.

Archaeology and Diaspora Judaism

Nóra Dávid
Description: This unit augments archaeology-related sessions organized at the International Meeting by providing focus on diaspora Judaism.

Call for papers: Archaeology provides a great amount of data about Judaism both in- and outside of Judea. For the history of ancient diaspora Judaism archeological finds are among our most important sources. There is a great and increasing amount of scholarly literature on diaspora Judaism. As ancient diaspora Judaism is being studied in different parts of the world and publications on it are written in many cases in the respective local languages and/or published in national journals this literature is neither easily accessible for the members of the Society nor even known. The aim of this panel is to bring together scholars researching different areas of ancient diaspora Judaism in the Roman Empire. Besides the already widely researched regions and groups (such as e.g. the Jews in ancient Egypt and in the city of Rome) the panel intends to target diaspora communities not as well known to a broader scholarly public (e.g. Phrygia, North-Africa, Britannia, etc.). Besides the invited speakers we are happy to accept papers as well!

Assyriology and the Bible

Dr. F. Rachel Magdalene
Description: The Assyriology and the Bible Consultation desires to gather together the far-flung papers that deal with Mesopotamian-related topics. In addition to encouraging traditional comparative work related to historiographic, philological, literary and religious studies, it wishes to invite new methods to examine both the conventional areas of research and newer questions related to Orientalism, postcolonial studies, and other ideological areas. This Consultation seeks to generate strongly interdisciplinary research between the Assyriological, biblical studies, and archaeological guilds. Papers relevant to one of the fields but which would provoke thought in the others are welcome, in addition to regular comparative papers. Any paper related to the societies whose languages were written in cuneiform script or the related Semitic scripts are invited.

Call for papers: (1) We invite papers on any topic related to Assyriology and the Bible for our open session. (2) We invite additionally papers related to the Neo-Assyrian Empire and the Levant for a second session and are especially interested in papers related to the Assyrian conquest of the Levant, the colonial administration of areas in the Levant, or the subsequent deportation of populations to Assyria.

Authority and Influence in Biblical Texts

Jan G. van der Watt
Description: The aim of this seminar is to investigate the nature of authority and leadership language as it is used in Biblical documents (both Old and New Testament). Since definitions of what leadership really is vary widely, the seminar uses a functional approach. Contributors will be asked to focus on the texts of the Old and New Testaments (each according to his or her expertise) and to investigate how authority is expressed and handled, but also how a group is convinced to move along with a leader to a common goal. Especially the dynamics of language, expression, rhetorics, etc. will be focused on.

Call for papers: Papers for this unit have been invited.

Bethsaida Excavations Project

Rami Arav
Description: The Bethsaida Excavations unit reports on the current progress of the dig and on topics related to the history and traditions of Bethsaida.

Call for papers: While his bones were interred at Scotland, Bethsaida was the birthplace of St. Andrew. The Bethsaida Excavations Project will organize one session of invited papers.

Bible and Empire

C.L. Crouch
Jonathan Stökl
Description: A unit examining the influence of imperial political powers on the development of the Bible in its historical context as well as the Bible’s use and reception throughout subsequent history.

Call for papers: For the 2013 IM in St Andrews there will be at least two sessions, both open.
  • Session I will focus on the biblical texts and the ancient empires (Egyptian, Assyrian, Greek, etc.). Papers addressing the influence of the Persian empire on the Hebrew Bible are particularly encouraged.
  • Session II will consist of papers examining the use and reception of the Bible in the context of the European empires, from the perspective of those subjected to imperial power as well as by empire-builders themselves.

Papers from both sessions may be submitted for publication, for which the deadline to submit manuscripts will be around October 1, 2013. Abstracts should be submitted via the SBL website in the usual way. Queries may be addressed to the chairs (carly.crouch@nottingham.ac.uk, t.j.stokl@hum.leidenuniv.nl).

Bible and Its Influence: History and Impact

Mary Mills
Andrew Mein
Description: This program unit explores how the Bible has been used and/or influential in the way it has been received in society. The focus is upon the reception of the text in contexts other than a narrow critical-academic one.

Call for papers: This program unit deals with the impact made by biblical material on society- whether in Arts, Politics, Social Models. The specific focus for this meeting is the impact and influence of the Bible in Scottish culture and offers of papers in this area are welcomed. There will also be opportunities for papers which meet the remit of the unit outside of the Scottish experience.

Bible and Syriac Studies in Context

Cornelia Horn
Description: This unit offers a forum for scholars of Syriac and related languages and literatures (including Arabic) to explore the intimate connections between Syriac biblical interpretation, historiography, hagiography, and culture in Oriental Christianity, Judaism, Manichaeism, Zoroastrianism, and Islam.

Call for papers: For 2013, we invite contributions for a panel discussion about the status of Syriac studies, particularly in relation to Biblical studies. Syriac studies has been a vastly expanding field and this panel will offer the opportunity to take stock and see where we are and where we, as a field, are hoping to go. It will also allow us to assess critically and constructively what opportunities there are for cooperation with adjacent fields, and where Syriac studies can spearhead new research initiatives. We also invite papers from those who wish to address the topics: a) Syriac manuscripts and Biblical/Scriptural interpretation; b) history through the lens of Syriac sources; c) intertextuality in Syriac and Arabic (sacred) texts; and d) comparative perspectives on the recitation of (sacred) texts. Papers on topics in the areas of hagiography, monasticism, women, and art/architecture are likewise very welcome. In addition, we plan to have at least one open-topic session for which we invite papers from anyone interested to contribute.

Bible and the Moving Image

David Shepherd
Caroline Vander Stichele
Description: The Bible and the Moving Image unit, titled the Bible and Cinema until 2011, is devoted to the use, influence, and development of biblical texts, motifs, and themes in the various media of the moving image, including cinema throughout its history, television, and the interactive narratives of gaming media.

Call for papers: A first session will be devoted to the bible and children in film, animation, television, etc. We are especially interested in papers that discuss how biblical stories and characters are presented to a youthful audience, both in terms of their content and form, as well as the underlying presuppositions about children and their interests and how that affects the selection of texts, topics and characters from the bible. The second session is an open session which invites the proposal of papers on any topic related to the use, influence, and development of biblical texts, motifs, and themes in the various media of the moving image, including cinema throughout its history, television, and the interactive narratives of gaming media. Papers which break new ground in any of these areas (and especially the latter) are particularly welcome.

Bible and Visual Culture

J. Cheryl Exum
Martin O'Kane
Katie Edwards
Rev. Michael Patella, OSB
Description: Some of the most engaging and creative insights into biblical narrative are found in paintings that adorn national and provincial galleries throughout Europe. They are a reminder that frequently our reading and understanding of biblical stories are influenced by our encounter with and response to the cultural, especially artistic, representations of a passage. One of the aims of the section, Bible and Visual Culture, is to locate distinctive and representative appropriations of biblical paintings in galleries across Europe, draw parallels between ways in which biblical texts engage the reader and biblical paintings the viewer, and to create methodologies that ensure that visual interpretations of the Bible play a central role in the 21st century in challenging (or supporting) traditional readings of biblical characters and plots. The Bible and Visual Culture Section also encourages explorations of the Bible and its influence in other visual media, such as sculpture, book illustration, film, advertising, street art and other aspects of popular culture. The benefit of such a research area is that it is multidisciplinary and makes use of insights from a range of disciplines including art history, psychology, gender studies, and postcolonial studies.

Call for papers: There will be two sessions. One will focus on British art. In keeping with the seminar’s overall aim of exploring biblical works of art in the venue where the SBL takes place, we particularly encourage topics that relate to British art from any century, and especially paintings by Scottish artists and the Pre-Raphaelites. Papers may be of a general nature or they may focus specifically on an individual painting, with preference given to paintings in the National Gallery of Scotland (http://www.nationalgalleries.org/) and other British galleries. The second will be an open session. Papers on sculpture, stained glass, book illustration, film and popular culture are encouraged.

Bible in Eastern and Oriental Orthodox Traditions

His Grace Dr. Vahan Hovhanessian
Description: This program unit will offer a forum for biblical professors and scholars from the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox traditions (the latter including Aramaic, Syriac, Armenian, Arabic, Georgian, Coptic, among others) to engage in critical study of the role of the Bible in eastern Christianity, past and present. A particular aim of this section will be to engage participating scholars in dealing with issues raised by contemporary and critical biblical scholarship. The committee invites presentation and discussion of papers from a variety of approaches and methodologies, including (but not limited to) theological, historiographic, philological, and literary studies.

Call for papers: This program unit will offer a forum for biblical professors and scholars from the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox traditions (the latter including Aramaic, Syriac, Armenian, Arabic, Georgian, Coptic, among others) to engage in critical study of the role of the Bible in eastern Christianity, past and present. A particular aim of this section will be to engage participating scholars in dealing with issues raised by contemporary and critical biblical scholarship. The committee invites presentation and discussion of papers from a variety of approaches and methodologies, including (but not limited to) theological, historiographic, philological, and literary studies.

Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Law

Gary Knoppers
Reinhard Achenbach
Description: The purpose of the Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Law Section is to promote interdisciplinary research on ancient Near Eastern, biblical, and post-biblical law. Methodological perspectives include historical-critical, literary, legal-historical, feminist, and social-scientific approaches.

Call for papers: The purpose of the Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Law Section is to promote interdisciplinary research on ancient Near Eastern, biblical, and post-biblical law. Methodological perspectives include historical-critical, literary, legal-historical, feminist, and social-scientific approaches.

Biblical Characters in the Three Traditions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam)

Mishael Maswari Caspi
John Tracy Greene
Description: This seminar approaches biblical literature through its most famous and pivotal characters, for it is around them that the subsequent biblical story is organized and arranged. Moreover, these characters have come to enjoy a life and fame that extends well beyond the basic Old Testament, Miqra, and New Testament, and even into the Qur’an and Islamic oral and written texts. As was demonstrated at the recent Tartu seminar, Samaritan texts and traditions (unfamiliar to many) have a contribution to make to the seminar as well. Our work seeks, among other goals, to facilitate a meaningful and informed dialogue between Jews, Christians, Muslims and Samaritans by providing both an open forum at annual conferences, and by providing through our publications a written reference library to consult. A further goal is to encourage and provide a forum in which new scholarly talent in biblical and related studies may be presented.

Call for papers: This seminar approaches biblical literature through its most famous and pivotal characters, for it is around them that the subsequent biblical story is organized and arranged. Moreover, these characters have come to enjoy a life and fame that extends well beyond the basic Old Testament, Miqra, and New Testament, and even into the Qur’an and Islamic oral and written texts. As was demonstrated at the recent Tartu seminar, Samaritan texts and traditions (unfamiliar to many) have a contribution to make to the seminar as well. Our work seeks, among other goals, to facilitate a meaningful and informed dialogue between Jews, Christians, Muslims and Samaritans by providing both an open forum at annual conferences, and by providing through our publications a written reference library to consult. A further goal is to encourage and provide a forum in which new scholarly talent in biblical and related studies may be presented.

Biblical Criticism and Cultural Studies

Jeremy Punt
Fernando F. Segovia
Description: The goal of this unit is to pursue the intersection between the fields of cultural studies and early Christian studies. As such, the unit will encompass a broad variety of foci: the question of method and theory in cultural biblical criticism; the application of cultural analysis to biblical criticism and thus the academic tradition of reading; and the appeal to and deployment of early Christian texts and contexts across other traditions of reading, such as the religious-theological, the cultural-artistic, and the material-social—all broadly defined. This goal follows and expands upon two earlier incarnations: more recently, Critical Theory and Biblical Interpretation; originally, The Bible and Social Location, which ran from 2003-2004 and then changed to The Bible and Critical Theory.

Call for papers: In 2013 the unit seeks to launch two multi-year projects with publications in mind. Both projects have the question of economics and justice at the core: one would address the social-cultural issue of migration, while the other would focus on the tradition of liberation/materialist hermeneutics. First of all, in the contemporary world, the process of migration is present everywhere and in every direction, as a result of fundamental economic and political crises. This project seeks to examine the problematic of migration in broad fashion, from the point of view of the early Christians texts and contexts as well as from the perspective of interpreters/interpretations and their contexts, academic and otherwise. Second, the tradition of liberation hermeneutics now stands at forty. This project seeks to examine the path of this critical tradition in broad fashion, such as re-reading the classic texts, examining the antecedents of materialist criticism, pursuing its global practice, and charting paths for the future. Papers that fit either or both of such foci and that would be interested in subsequent development toward full-fledged studies for publication would be welcome

Biblical Interpretation in Early Christianity

D. Jeffrey Bingham
Description: This program unit explores the interpretative structures, methodologies, and concerns of patristic exegesis and the various assumptions underlying it.

Call for papers: This program unit explores the interpretative structures, methodologies, and concerns of patristic exegesis and the various assumptions underlying it.

Biblical Masculinities

Peter-Ben Smit
Ovidiu Creanga
Description: This unit explores expressions of masculinities in biblical literature, following the emergence of masculinities studies—which intersects queer, cultural, ethnic/racial, and postcolonial studies, to name but a few—at the turn of the twenty-first century and their recent advancements. The unit systematically reflects on what the insights arising from such studies can contribute to an understanding of the biblical writers' male ideology, seeks to tackle theoretical issues, and provides applications for, and limitations to, reading HB and NT texts through the prism of the masculinities question.

Call for papers: God's Masculinity At the second session of the "biblical masculinities" consultation, the focus in on the masculinity of God. How is it constructed, how does it relate to contemporary hegemonic and non-hegemonic concepts of masculinity, and how does it function in the Scriptures and beyond? Papers should focus on aspects of God's masculinity and analyze it with attention to its historical and social contexts, or with an eye to its functioning in Jewish and Christian texts.

Biblical Theology

Mark Elliott
Carey Walsh
Description: The unit explores the hermeneutical innovations and theological implications of the location of critical biblical interpretation within the confessional communities of the various traditions. Particular attention is given to the relationship between systematic theology, practical theology, philosophical theology, and biblical studies, with respect to their nature and status as discrete disciplines.

Call for papers: After our highly successful sessions in Amsterdam on Biblical Theologies of the NT and the History of Biblical Theology, there will again be two sessions. The first will consider New Testament Theologies of the last twenty-five years or so and address questions such as: what is a 'biblical theology of the New Testament'? Have there been any successful attempts to propose unity within the NT canon? The second section will be on Comparative Biblical Theology: Jewish and Christian, around a theme of Divine Presence and Providence. A combination of exegetical and thematic approaches is encouraged.

Comparative Studies of Literature from the Persian and Hellenistic Periods

Louis C. Jonker
Description: This section, titled Historical Books (Hebrew Bible) through 2011, encourages comparative studies of literature from the Persian and Hellenistic Periods in order to map the common trends (theological; socio-psychological; rhetorical; etc.) occurring in historiographical (biblical; apocryphal; extra-biblical), prophetic and wisdom literature of the period.

Call for papers: The section "Comparative Studies of Literature from the Persian and Hellenistic Periods" encourages scholars specializing in different textual corpora, but all working on literature from the Persian and Hellenistic periods, to collectively engage in research on the common literary, historiographical, theological, ideological, rhetorical or socio-psychological trends of the literature from these periods. We take the historiographical books of the Hebrew Bible as point of departure, and we want to solicit a series of comparative studies with this literature over the next six years (starting in 2012) at the SBL International Meetings. Our second session at the 2013 meeting in St Andrews will bring historiographical and prophetic literature from the Persian and Hellenistic periods in comparison. At least two sessions (but possibly three, depending on the number of proposal submissions) will be organized. The first will be a joint session with the Prophets Section in which a panel of four invited speakers (two specializing in historiographical, and the other two in prophetic literature of the Persian and Hellenistic periods) will be organized. One (or two) open sessions with five open slots (in each) will provide space for other scholars to come and share their comparative research between historiographical and prophetic literature in our collective effort to map out the trends in Persian and Hellenistic period literature. Proposals are therefore invited for these open slots.

Concept Analysis and the Hebrew Bible

Won W. Lee
Description: The unit examines concepts that unify particular textual units or books in the Hebrew Bible and the interrelationship of competing concepts within the same book or corpus in the Hebrew Bible (e.g., God's love and hate; peace and violence; wealth and poverty).

Call for papers: The unit examines concepts that unify particular textual units or books in the Hebrew Bible and the interrelationship of competing concepts within the same book or corpus in the Hebrew Bible (e.g., God's love and hate; peace and violence; wealth and poverty).

Contextual Interpretation of the Bible (Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and New Testament)

Archie Chi-Chung Lee
Athalya Brenner-Idan
Jeremy Punt
Daniel Patte
Kari Latvus
Nicole Wilkinson Duran
Description: The goal of this Consultation is to explore the interest in developing a SBL seminar or section on Contextual Biblical Interpretation, its different strategies (including “inculturation,” inter(con)textualization, and reading with “ordinary” readers) and its methodological justifications, and the extent to which all interpretations are contextual. We are especially interested in seemingly “marginal” (from the geographical, gender, faith, class, age, communal and so forth) aspects and in community.

Call for papers: We welcome papers that examine any biblical text from within a reader’s explicitly articulated context. Our HB sessions this year are seeking especially, but not only papers on texts of the so called "historical" books beyond Joshua and Judges; that is, Samuel, Kings, Ezra-Nehemiah and Chronicles. Our NT sessions are mainly interested in papers dealing with texts from Luke, Acts, John, and Revelation. Both the NT and HB parts of our group are also interested in papers that focus more on the contextual method itself, its challenges, pitfalls, and payoffs, and its current position in the academy. Contributors will be asked for their drafts about a fortnight before the Annual Meeting. HB Drafts will be posted on Athalya Brenner's homepage, and NT drafts will be posted on Daniel Patte's homepage. At the conference papers will be summarized, not read in full, to leave maximum time for discussion. Acceptance of papers for the consultation's SBL sessions is a first step toward, but does not guarantee, publication in the corresponding volume of the ongoing contextual series Texts@Contexts (Fortress Press).

Digital Humanities in Biblical, Early Jewish, and Christian Studies

David Hamidovic
Claire Clivaz
Description: The unit focuses on the transformations of Biblical, Early Jewish and Christian studies in the emerging digital culture. We propose to study interactions between Digital Humanities and Biblical, Early Jewish and Christian studies (literature, manuscripts, art, archaeology, epigraphy, methodology).

Call for papers: «Digital Humanities and Manuscripts» The process of editing of ancient Biblical manuscripts, as well as of editing other ancient Jewish and Christian manuscripts, has been transformed by the emerging digital culture. The digitalization of the manuscripts raises technical questions, such as automatic reading or multispectral imagery, and leads us to new challenges. How do we understand the "text" in the digital culture? In addition, the capacity to study and valorize online a specific manuscript challenges the notion of “critical edition”. The unit welcomes proposals of papers about ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek or Arabic manuscripts - either literary or documentary texts - in the fields of Biblical studies, early Jewish and Christian studies. We hope to receive papers either on technical points, or new interpretations with digitalization or data managing, or questions about the notion of “critical edition”. «Digital Humanities and Academic Publishing» In the digital culture, the way of looking after sources and data, as well as the way of academic publishing is drastically evolving. The seminar would like to investigate how digital tools and culture influence research on biblical studies, early Jewish and early Christian studies, from scholarly and editing/publishing points of view. Topics such as new ways of publishing/editing (interactive publications, preprint peer-review, multimedia publications...), or data research and management (the evaluation of websites in research, GIS tools, the use of Wikipedia in teaching...) are welcomed, as well as papers on epistemological reflection on scholarship in the digital culture.

Early Christianity and the Ancient Economy

John T. Fitzgerald
Fika J. van Rensburg
Description: The Early Christianity and the Ancient Economy unit is the foundational component of an international, interdisciplinary project that seeks to delineate the relationship between early Christianity and the ancient economy in the period from Jesus to Justinian, demonstrating both similarities and differences in attitudes, approaches to problems, and attempted solutions.

Call for papers: The Early Christianity and Ancient Economy Section sponsors three sub-projects: The first sub-project involves a study of all the major aspects of the economy in the ancient world, especially the Roman Empire. The second sub-project examines first-century early Christianity both in relationship to the ancient economy and in regard to its own economic aspects. The third sub-project does the same for Christianity in the second to the fifth centuries. Both synchronic and diachronic studies are encouraged, as are contributions focused on specific issues (such as money), texts, authors, themes, and events. Paper proposals for all three sub-projects are welcomed, especially those that focus on the economy of Roman Britain and/or make use of papyri, inscriptions, and other realia. Those submitting a proposal should designate in the Abstract the sub-project for which the paper should be considered.

Ecological Hermeneutics

Peter Trudinger
Description: This unit will focus on hermeneutical principles and models for ecological readings of the biblical text and tradition. Attention would be paid to the anthropocentric bias of texts and readers as well as to discerning alternative traditions sympathetic to ecology, Earth and the Earth community. The aim is to explore the art of reading the text with empathy for the natural world.

Call for papers: This unit will focus on hermeneutical principles and models for ecological readings of the biblical text and tradition. Attention would be paid to the anthropocentric bias of texts and readers as well as to discerning alternative traditions sympathetic to ecology, Earth and the Earth community. The aim is to explore the art of reading the text with empathy for the natural world.

Epigraphical and Paleological Studies Pertaining to the Biblical World

Meir Lubetski
Description: The unit focuses on inscriptions and icons bearing on the Bible world, with special concentration on the meaning and analysis of seals, ostraca, magic bowls, inscriptions, and scripts from the ancient Near East.

Call for papers: The unit focuses on inscriptions and icons bearing on the Bible world, with special concentration on the meaning and analysis of seals, ostraca, magic bowls, inscriptions, and scripts from the ancient Near East.

Epistle to the Hebrews

David M. Moffitt
Eric F. Mason
Description: This unit is designed to encourage conversation about the historical, hermeneutical, and theological issues raised in Hebrews. Special attention will be given to papers that engage topics relevant to the portion of the Epistle under consideration each year.

Call for papers: This consultation will offer two sessions at the 2013 meeting. A thematic session with prearranged papers will address key issues in the interpretation of Hebrews 8-10. Proposals are invited for an open session featuring papers on any subject related to study of Hebrews.

Expressions of Religion in Israel

Mark Alan Christian
Description: Formerly titled "Israelite Religion," this program unit focuses on the broad scope of Israelite religion and cult beginning with the first temple period. It provides a forum for scholars to explore rapidly expanding conceptions of "Israelite religion." Contributors interpret biblical traditions and artifactual discoveries in Israel in the light of comparable traditions and material evidences in neighboring countries.

Call for papers: Formerly titled "Israelite Religion," this program unit focuses on the broad scope of Israelite religion and cult beginning with the first temple period. It provides a forum for scholars to explore rapidly expanding conceptions of "Israelite religion." Contributors interpret biblical traditions and artifactual discoveries in Israel in the light of comparable traditions and material evidences in neighboring countries.

Families and Children in the Ancient World

Mikael Larsson
Reidar Aasgaard
Anna Rebecca Solevag
Description: This unit provides a forum for presenting and discussing issues related to families, children and biblical literature. The section is open to presentations on the Hebrew Bible, the Christian Testament and early Christian, Rabbinic and Greco-Roman material from a variety of perspectives and using a variety of methods.

Call for papers: For this meeting we plan two sessions.
  • The first will be a session on the topic of children’s bibles and will include both invited papers and an open call. The session will explore the contextual concerns of children’s bibles. Are, for example, Scandinavian children’s bibles different from American? Or African from Asian? If so, how do they differ and why? Papers on these and similar questions are encouraged.
  • The second will be an open session. We encourage paper proposals on a broad range of topics relating to children and families in the Hebrew Bible, the Christian Testament, early Christianity, or the Greco-Roman world in general. Submissions from a variety of perspectives, such as gender, medicine, archaeology and literature, are welcome.

Feminist Interpretations

Irmtraud Fischer
Description: The aim of this unit is to provide a forum for research in issues and questions relating to feminist methods of interpretation. While specifically focused on methodological concerns, we are also concerned to ground that reflection in the reality of engagement with specific texts.

Call for papers: For the 2013 SBL IM in St Andrews, the Feminist Interpretations unit will organize four sessions. 1) Open call for papers on methodological issues specifically relating to exegesis in feminist interpretation and gender studies. Papers are invited on divergent methodologies (e.g., historical critical, narratology, intertextuality…) and their relevance for gender studies. 2) Open call for papers on feminist exegesis and cultural studies, specifically on the reception history of gender relevant themes and texts of the Bible. 3) Open call for papers on feminist exegesis and traditional exegesis – two separate fields? After more than 40 years of scientific feminist exegesis there are still publications of traditional exegesis reading not even any of the publications done by women with gender awareness. This session calls for papers that reflect the relationship of feminist and traditional exegesis and the lack of reception of Gender studies, especially in research done based on historical critical methods, but also gaps in feminist exegesis concerning themes or methods. 4) Open call: Junior section of gender relevant exegesis. In this section we expect papers of young researchers presenting their studies.

Forced-Return Migrations (Exile-Return) in Biblical Literature

John Ahn
Martien A. Halvorson-Taylor
Description: The forced migration and return migrations periods (exile-return) have been prominent for biblical literature. This new International Consultation fosters research and dialogue on displacement and resettlement issues pertaining to the 6th and 5th centuries B.C.E. We welcome traditional historical, literary, redactional, sociological, post-, paleoclimateological, theological and others methods toward a better understanding of these periods. Studies on the metaphor of exile or forced and return migration studies: im/migration, intergeneration, acculturation, assimilation, transnationalism, development induced displacement, internal displacement, refugee, repatriation, disaporic homecoming, ethnic return studies—are highly encouraged.

Call for papers: The forced migration and return migrations periods (exile-return) have been prominent for biblical literature. This new International Consultation fosters research and dialogue on displacement and resettlement issues pertaining to the 6th and 5th centuries B.C.E. We welcome traditional historical, literary, redactional, sociological, post-, paleoclimateological, theological and others methods toward a better understanding of these periods. Studies on the metaphor of exile or forced and return migration studies: im/migration, intergeneration, acculturation, assimilation, transnationalism, development induced displacement, internal displacement, refugee, repatriation, disaporic homecoming, ethnic return studies—are highly encouraged.

Gospel of Mark

Elizabeth Shively
Geert Van Oyen
Description: Our aim is to provide a forum for scholars and graduate students to explore all aspects of and approaches to the research, hermeneutics, and interpretation of the Gospel of Mark, including (but not limited to) historical, exegetical, theological, methodological, and literary studies. We are especially interested in the investigation of new questions, new areas of inquiry, and new strategies for reading Mark.

Call for papers: The Gospel of Mark unit will hold one session for the 2013 International Meeting. This is an invited session on the topic “Communication, Pedagogy, and the Gospel of Mark." The aim of this session is to invite scholars from a range of perspectives to apply their approach specifically to the teaching of Mark. Key questions are: How do we evaluate traditional pedagogical models in light of recent approaches to the Gospel of Mark? What kind of educational and communicative practices should Markan studies develop in a pluralistic world? What differences, if any, do context (e.g., secular or confessional) and audience expectations make in our approach?

Healthcare and Disability in the Ancient World

Candida R. Moss
Laura M. Zucconi
Joel S. Baden
Description: The unit seeks to foster scholarship related to disability in all fields of biblical studies. Major areas of concern include medical history of the Ancient Near East and Greco-Roman worlds; the religious, legal, and cultural status of people with disabilities in the biblical and formative Jewish and Christian periods; the representation of disability in biblical and cognate texts, biblical theology of the same, and disability in the history of biblical interpretation.

Call for papers: The Unit plans to have at least two sessions at the 2013 meeting. One of these will be an invited session focused on the topic of the categorization of disabilities in the Bible and its surrounding cultures, with special attention given to the categories of blindness, deafness and muteness. The other session(s) will be open, and paper proposals are welcome on any aspect of the study of health and disability related to the Bible. Paper proposals that attend to the same issues as the invited session - categorization, blindness, deafness, and muteness - are encouraged, though any proposals relevant to the general topic of the Unit are welcome.

Hellenistic Greek Language and Linguistics

Paul Danove
Peter Spitaler
Steven E. Runge
Albert L. Lukaszewski
Description: Hellenistic Greek forms the basis of studies relative to both testaments as well as much of the ancient world. This section welcomes papers on any aspect of the Greek found in the Septuagint, New Testament, or other Hellenistic literature. Linguistic, grammatical and lexical studies are particularly encouraged.

Call for papers: Hellenistic Greek forms the basis of studies relative to both testaments as well as much of the ancient world. This section welcomes papers on any aspect of the Greek found in the Septuagint, New Testament, or other Hellenistic literature. Linguistic, grammatical and lexical studies are particularly encouraged.

Hellenistic Judaism

Ljubica Jovanovic
Stephen Herring
Description: This section is dedicated to the study of all aspects of Judaism related to Hellenistic times. The Hellenistic period includes its chronological, cultural, and linguistic dimensions.

Call for papers: From the city’s founding legend to the More Old Testament Pseudepigrapha Project, Hellenistic Judaism is very much alive in St. Andrews. For the 2013 ISBL conference, we welcome all papers on any aspect of the legacy of Hellenistic Judaism. Those that focus on the richness of its literary tradition are especially welcome.

International Qur’anic Studies Association

Gabriel Said Reynolds
Emran El-Badawi
Michael Pregill
Description: The International Qur’anic Studies Association fosters scholarship on the Qur’an, its context, its relationship to other scriptural traditions, and its influence upon literature and culture. IQSA facilitates the broad and open discussion of the Qur’an from a variety of academic perspectives.

Call for papers: The International Qur’anic Studies Association fosters scholarship on the Qur’an, its context, its relationship to other scriptural traditions, and its influence upon literature and culture. IQSA facilitates the broad and open discussion of the Qur’an from a variety of academic perspectives.

Johannine Literature

Yak-Hwee Tan
Description: The main purpose of the unit is to address issues and concerns having to do with the analysis and interpretation of the Johannine literature--a major component of the Christian Scriptures, encompassing for our purposes the Gospel of John and the three Johannine letters.

Call for papers: The main purpose of the unit is to address issues and concerns having to do with the analysis and interpretation of the Johannine literature--a major component of the Christian Scriptures, encompassing for our purposes the Gospel of John and the three Johannine letters.

Judaica

Rivka Ulmer
Description: The section is concerned with all aspects of the literatures of ancient, medieval, and modern Judaisms, especially as they intersect with biblical literature. Exploration of Judaism and the arts and material culture are especially encouraged.

Call for papers: We accept several papers concerning the Jewish interpretation and reception of the Bible throughout different periods of engagement with other cultures. If possible, such papers may contain reflections upon the rich biblical interpretation in Scotland.

Methods in New Testament Studies

Markus Lang
Description: The unit is devoted to the exploration and application of new methods to the New Testament text. The use of literary critical methods is encouraged. The goal of the unit is to develop new ways to understand the development of the early Christian community.

Call for papers: The unit is devoted to the exploration and application of new methods to the New Testament text. The use of literary critical methods is encouraged. The goal of the unit is to develop new ways to understand the development of the early Christian community.

Nag Hammadi and Gnosticism

Lautaro Roig Lanzillotta
Andre Gagne
Description: The Nag Hammadi and Gnosticism Section provides a forum for current international research on the Coptic codices discovered at Nag Hammadi, Egypt, in 1945. Research areas include: issues of text and translation; analysis and interpretation of the tractates; codicological analysis; background and provenance of the manuscripts; studies relevant to the larger social and religio-historical contexts of the Nag Hammadi texts, especially their relation to Jewish, Christian and Greco-Roman religious traditions.

Call for papers: Paper proposals are welcome on all topics appropriate for the Nag Hammadi and Gnosticism section, but we especially encourage the submission of paper proposals on the topic of “Views on Man and the Cosmos in Nag Hammadi Writings and Related Texts”. The scholarly effort of the last 30 years has made sufficiently clear that the Nag Hammadi Library is far from offering a monolithic worldview. In fact it includes a wide spectrum of views and positions regarding almost every single aspect of human being’s reality: the relation of humankind to God and the divine realm, its present condition in the cosmic world, its future salvation and the means to achieve this, among other things, are dealt with in a variety of ways. What are the views on man in this corpus? Are the bipartite and tripartite anthropological patterns the only traceable frameworks? Or can we find other thought patterns as well? What can we say about the provenance of the relevant anthropological views and how did they develop? And what about the views on the cosmos? Do we find the same bipartite and tripartite patterns, or are there also other views? What is the relationship of the worldviews in these documents and the cosmological and astrological views current in the ancient world, more specifically in late antiquity? Do the texts present a consistent view of man and the cosmos, e.g. in interrelating man and the cosmos as micro- and macro-cosmos?

Palestine and Babylon: Two Jewish Late Antique Cultures and Their Interrelation

Ronit Nikolsky
Description: This section focuses on the uniqueness of the Palestinian and the Babylonian rabbinic cultures, and traces their interrelation: what are typical, or original, Palestinian exegetical, Halakhic and narrative traditions; what are the characteristics, of the Babylonian rabbinic culture, its development and crystallization; how and when did the Babylonian culture gain prominence in the Jewish culture of the Byzantine and Medieval periods.

Call for papers: In 2014 in Vienna, the program will focus on the genre of "acts of sages" (Maase Khahamim) in the Palestinian and Babylonian culture. More details to follow.

Pastoral and Catholic Epistles

Felix H. Cortez
Description: The section encourages the study of the historical, hermeneutical and theological issues raised by the Pastoral and Catholic Epistles.

Call for papers: This section has a wide object of study, a total of 10 epistles (1 & 2 Timothy, Titus, James, 1 & 2 Peter, 1, 2, 3 John, and Jude). Its aim is to promote the study of these epistles in at least four ways: (1) exploring new approaches to their study, (2) suggesting solutions to exegetical, literary, text critical, historical, and theological problems associated with them, (3) highlighting new areas of research, and (4) evaluating the significance of the history of their scholarship. Proposals on any of these topics are welcomed.

Paul and Pauline Literature

Kathy Ehrensperger
William S. Campbell
Description: The unit provides a forum for presentation and discussion of original scholarly research on all facets of the interpretation of the Pauline Corpus in the New Testament. This includes consideration of exegetical, socio-historical, history of religions, theological, literary, history of interpretation, and methodological questions.

Call for papers: The unit provides a forum for presentation and discussion of original scholarly research on all facets of the interpretation of the Pauline Corpus in the New Testament. This includes consideration of exegetical, socio-historical, history of religions, theological, literary, history of interpretation, and methodological questions.

Pentateuch (Torah)

Dr. F. Rachel Magdalene
Description: The unit provides a forum for presentation and discussion of research on the Pentateuch / Torah, with a particular focus on transmission-historical issues and linkage of that area of inquiry with other more synchronic methodologies.

Call for papers: (1) We invite proposals for one open session on any topic related to the Pentateuch/Torah, consistent with our usual focus on transmission-historical issues or the linkage of that area of inquiry with other methodologies. (2) We also invite papers on the topic of law and narrative within the Pentateuch/Torah. We especially encourage papers that use legal hermeneutics or narrative theory in approaching the problem. (3) Finally, we invite papers concerning inner-biblical interpretation of any section of the Pentateuch/Torah by any non-Pentateuch/Torah biblical provisions.

Persian Period

James Nogalski
Description: This seminar focuses on the history and literature of Yehud in the context of the Persian period, 539-333 BCE. We have particular interests in imperialism and its effects, pluralism within the period, practices of religion within the household, and the development of temple, cult, and canon.

Call for papers: This seminar focuses on the history and literature of Yehud in the context of the Persian period, 539-333 BCE. We have particular interests in imperialism and its effects, pluralism within the period, practices of religion within the household, and the development of temple, cult, and canon. This year we will devote at least one session to papers dealing with criteria for distinguishing texts from the early, middle, and late Persian period. Proposals for this and other topics relevant to the goals of the consultation are welcomed.

Place, Space, and Identity in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Gert T. M. Prinsloo
Karen Wenell
Description: Investigates the inherent spatiality of human existence and how it affects human behavior, ideology, identity, and orientation. Ancient Mediterranean texts and societies are studied from a decidedly spatial perspective. Different approaches to spatiality will enrich investigations, e.g. narratological space, critical spatiality, sociological theories on space, space and identity, space and body.

Call for papers: Two spatial themes will be discussed, both consisting of a mix of invited and open papers. • The first theme is “Body and Spatial Experience.” Papers investigating corporeal experience in space, and how bodies influence, and are influenced by, space(s) will be welcomed. Consideration will also be given to papers that engage with things, or objects, in relation to the body and space. Contributions from diverse fields, e.g. textual studies, iconography, and archaeology will be welcomed. We encourage contributors to be innovative and utilize approaches from different fields, e.g. narratology, critical-spatiality, feminism, sociology, psychology, cognitive linguistics, philosophy and archaeology. • The second theme is “Spatial Experience and Conceptions of the Afterlife.” Papers investigating ancient Mediterranean worldview(s), especially conceptions of the “afterlife” as “imagined space” will be welcomed. Contributions from diverse fields, e.g. textual studies, iconography, and archaeology will be welcomed. We encourage contributors to be innovative and utilize approaches from different fields, e.g. narratology, critical-spatiality, feminism, sociology, psychology, cognitive linguistics, philosophy and archaeology in their interpretation of ancient Mediterranean worldview(s) and conceptions of the afterlife.

Professional Issues

Heather A. McKay
Description: When a scholar takes up a new appointment (or a postgraduate student joins an existing department) there is more to 'fitting in' than finding a desk, a computer and access to the photocopier. There is also the need to build a place in discussions, a role in meetings, a respect for and valuing of his/her skills/ commitment/ discipline/ methodology/ etc

Call for papers: This year we are seeking short presentations of10-15 minutes with a planned discussion time of 20-15 minutes thereafter. The topics we are particularly interested in are discussions, or sets of 'working questions' about: a) the comparison of employing 'active' and 'passive' pedagogies and the benefits/disadvantages thereof, or b) applying a similar approach to comparing 'high-impact' and 'traditional' teaching styles.

Prophets

William A. Tooman
Tyler Mayfield
Description: This unit aims to provide an open forum for scholars to present papers on a variety of topics germane to the study of ancient Israelite prophecy and prophetic literature.

Call for papers: The Prophets Unit invites proposals for two open sessions on any area of research related to the prophetic literature of the Hebrew Bible including its interpretation, reception, history, or criticism. Papers should be 20 minutes long, with an additional 10 minutes left for discussion. In addition, this unit is jointly sponsoring with the Qumran section a session on the theme "Revelation and Prophecy at Qumran," for which proposals are welcome on any topic related to the theme, including: revealed knowledge and revelatory experience in Second Temple Judaism, reconceptualization(s) of revelation in the Dead Sea Scrolls, prophetic activity at Qumran, Qumran eschatology, the textual history or interpretive history of prophetic books as reflected in the scrolls, and the relationship of prophecy to scriptural interpretation, wisdom, or law in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Second Temple literature.

Psychological Hermeneutics of Biblical Themes and Texts

Heather A. McKay
Bas van Os
Description: Psychological Criticism complements approaches that consider texts and their impact/s from the perspective of the reader, alongside literary, rhetorical and theological approaches, identifying how texts operate within the minds of their readers, or portray thoughts and motivations of the characters in their narratives.

Call for papers: Psychological Hermeneutics of Biblical Themes and Texts seeks to complement other forms of Biblical Criticism with psychological insights and methods in order to gain a fuller understanding of the worlds of biblical texts and readers, both ancient and modern. We encourage participants to combine the study of a specific biblical text or theme with a specific psychological theory or concept. Our aim is modest but substantive: can the use of this specific psychological theory add to our understanding of the text and its impact? To this end, the unit provides ample time for presentation and discussion. This year we plan to have three sessions:
  • Hebrew Bible: Psychological aspects of propitiation and sacrifice in the Hebrew Bible and its interpreters.
  • New Testament: Psychological implications of the New Perspective on Paul: what happened/happens when the focus is not on judgment and grace but on covenantal faith?
  • Open session.
We welcome proposals for all sessions.

Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls

Cecilia Wassen
Sidnie White Crawford
Description: The unit provides forum for presentation and discussion of views relating to the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Qumran settlement, and the people of that place and of those documents.

Call for papers: The Qumran Section will be sponsoring three separate sessions. The first, by invitation only, will be on scribal traditions in the Dead Sea Scrolls. The second, jointly sponsored with the Prophets section, is on the theme "Revelation and Prophecy at Qumran," for which proposals are welcome on any topic related to the theme, including: revealed knowledge and revelatory experience in Second Temple Judaism, reconceptualization(s) of revelation in the Dead Sea Scrolls, prophetic activity at Qumran, Qumran eschatology, the textual history or interpretive history of prophetic books as reflected in the scrolls, and the relationship of prophecy to scriptural interpretation, wisdom, or law in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Second Temple literature. The third session is an open call for papers on any topic related to the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Quran and Islamic Tradition in Comparative Perspective

Zohar Hadromi-Allouche
Michael Pregill
Description: This unit seeks to foster comparative research on the Quran and Muslim culture, discourse, and devotional life. We encourage papers and panels that examine the Quran and Islamic tradition in the wider context of the history of the Western monotheisms; explore Islam’s profound historical relationships with Judaism, Christianity, and the biblical heritage; and promote comparative inquiry and intercommunal dialogue more generally.

Call for papers: The Quran and Islamic Tradition in Comparative Perspective unit of the ISBL welcomes proposals for both individual papers and pre-arranged panels at the international meeting at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, July 7-11, 2013. Suggested topics might include, but are not limited to: prophets and miracles in Islam, Judaism, and Christianity – comparative perspectives; vocational journeys in Islamic and other religious traditions; parallels to biblical, Jewish, and Christian tradition in the Quran and Islamic literature; relationships between Jewish, Christian, and Muslim exegetical traditions; the various discursive expressions of intercommunal exchange and relations, including both dialogue and polemic; Islam in European discourse; Muslim cultural, religious, social, and political life in the West. We especially welcome papers of a theoretical or methodological nature that explore the ramifications of the comparative study of the Bible and Jewish and Christian tradition alongside the Quran and Islamic tradition. Proposals for panels or individual papers can be submitted online at http://www.sbl-site.org/meetings/Internationalmeeting.aspx. The deadline for submission of proposals is February 1, 2013. Please note that membership in the Society of Biblical Literature is required in order to submit a paper proposal. Please contact the program unit chairs for more information: Michael Pregill, Dept. of Religious Studies, Elon University (michael.pregill@gmail.com); Zohar Hadromi-Allouche, Divinity and Religious Studies, University of Aberdeen (z.hadromi-allouche@abdn.ac.uk)

Ritual in the Biblical World

Ada Taggar-Cohen
Russell C. D. Arnold
Description: The Ritual in the Biblical World Section focuses on the nature, meaning and function of ritual found in textual sources (HB, NT, non-canonical) in the larger context of the material culture of the ancient world, employing insights and methods of the field of ritual theory and enthnography.

Call for papers: We invite papers for an open session on all aspects of ritual activities, with their textual, as well as archaeological and iconographical expressions, in the larger context of their cultural and religious functions in Ancient Israel and Late Antiquity.

Sacred Texts in their Socio-Political Contexts

John Anthony Dunne
Description: This unit is organised in conjunction with the third St Andrews Graduate Conference for Biblical and Early Christian Studies.

Call for papers:

This section is organised in conjunction with the third St Andrews Graduate Conference for Biblical and Early Christian Studies, and will explore the (theo)political visions of authoritative/sacred texts in their historical contexts. Topics will include (but will not be limited to), sacred texts and resistance to hegemony/imperial ideology, negotiating power relations, the theopolitical imagination, the formation of political communities, and 'apocalyptic' texts and political theology.

This is aimed at graduate students and early career scholars, welcoming contributors from the following fields of research: Old Testament / Hebrew Bible, Pseudepigrapha & Dead Sea Scrolls, New Testament, and Early Christianity.

The keynote speakers for the four sections respectively are: Nathan MacDonald, Loren Stuckenbruck, Matthew Novenson, and Candida Moss.

It is intended that selected papers will be published in a proceedings volume.

You may also submit papers directly to Db47@st-andrews.ac.uk.

Septuagint Studies

Kristin De Troyer
Description: This unit is open to all papers devoted to the Old Greek text and related versions.

Call for papers: This unit is open to all papers devoted to the Old Greek text and related versions.

Status of Women in the Profession

Claudia V. Camp
Description: The Committee holds sessions each year exploring the nature of the profession as experienced by women biblical scholars. The goal of the sessions are to provide a forum for open discussion, networking, and the sharing of ideas.

Call for papers: The Committee holds sessions each year exploring the nature of the profession as experienced by women biblical scholars. The goal of the sessions are to provide a forum for open discussion, networking, and the sharing of ideas.

Stylistics and the Hebrew Bible

Elizabeth R.Hayes
Karolien Vermeulen
Description: The unit will offer a forum for scholars interested in stylistics and the Hebrew Bible. The goal is to explore the relation between form and meaning of the text drawing on a variety of approaches (rhetorical, narratological, cognitive, ideological…).

Call for papers: The Stylistics and the Hebrew Bible section invites submissions for three sessions in 2013. • The first and second session focus on the 2007 special issue of Prooftexts, entitled ‘Before and After “The Art of Biblical Narrative”’, a volume dedicated to the contributions of literary criticism in Biblical studies. In addition to a session with invited speakers, we also solicit papers for an open session on this topic. Scholars are invited to formulate critiques, responses and answers to the issues raised in the volume. Contributions that address developments in the field postdating 2007 are particularly welcomed. • A third session will explore various devices present in the Hebrew Bible text and focus on how they can enhance our understanding of the text. Papers should address a specific feature in any given book or combination of books. Features can be semantic, structural, grammatical or phonetic in nature or consist of a mixture of these elements (examples: hendiadys, (Janus) parallelism, geminate clusters, paronomasia …).

Synoptic Gospels

Sakari Hakkinen
Description: The Synoptic Gospels, which have formed a coherent unit since antiquity, have played an important role in modern scholarship. This section provides an open forum for the presentation of papers, from a variety of perspectives and using a variety of methods, on these seminal religious texts.

Call for papers: Study of the Synoptic Gospels is critical for a literate understanding of religious discussions and imperatives in today's world. Proposals from all perspectives and academic methods as they pertain to the synoptic gospels are welcome and will be scheduled in four categories: the first will focus on Mark, the second on Matthew, the third on Luke, and the last on the comparative analysis of two or more of the synoptics. While all topics are welcome, the subject of poverty in the synoptics is especially encouraged. Global issues of poverty are at a crisis state and the world of biblical scholarship needs to continue to be even more involved as advocates for a biblical literacy that places the impoverished and marginalized at center stage for study and action. Please indicate in your proposal which category your paper will fit best.

Wisdom Literature

Katharine J. Dell
Description: The Wisdom Literature section seeks to encourage an ongoing discourse on new ideas and methodologies in the study of Wisdom Literature. The primary focus is on Biblical wisdom - Proverbs, Job, Qoheleth, the Wisdom Psalms and other texts influenced by wisdom ideas, as well as Ben Sira and Wisdom of Solomon. The section is also concerned with the relationship between biblical wisdom literature and cognate texts of the ancient Near East.

Call for papers: Papers on any topic related to the biblical wisdom and its ancient Near Eastern parallels are welcome for open sessions. There will be two or more open sessions (with five open slots in each).

Working with Biblical Manuscripts (Textual Criticism)

Jan Krans
Tommy Wasserman
Description: This program unit is devoted to the text of “biblical” writings, as understood in the broad sense of the term: This includes the Jewish Bible, early Jewish literature, and the Old Testament (in Hebrew and Aramaic, Greek, and other ancient languages), as well as early Christian literature and the New Testament (in Greek, Latin, and other ancient languages). We offer a forum for the investigation of all types of material witnesses related to the text of this literature—tablets, manuscripts, ostraca, inscriptions—and for the consideration of the textual form of this literature reflected in its citation and use by ancient authors and in writings from antiquity through the Middle Ages. This consists not only of contributions that deal with the Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin textual witnesses, but also those that engage evidence in Ugaritic, Arabic, Syriac, Ethiopic, Coptic, Armenian, and other linguistic traditions. A wide variety of additional issues related to textual criticism are also addressed, including epigraphy, manuscript studies, papyrology, codicology, paleography, scribal habits and the production of texts, the history of transmission (and its cultural, social, and religious settings), the practice of textual criticism from antiquity to modern times, restoration and conservation, the use of modern technology in studying this material, the production of critical editions, and discussions of particular passages.

Call for papers: This program unit is devoted to the text of “biblical” writings, as understood in the broad sense of the term: This includes the Jewish Bible, early Jewish literature, and the Old Testament (in Hebrew and Aramaic, Greek, and other ancient languages), as well as early Christian literature and the New Testament (in Greek, Latin, and other ancient languages). We offer a forum for the investigation of all types of material witnesses related to the text of this literature—tablets, manuscripts, ostraca, inscriptions—and for the consideration of the textual form of this literature reflected in its citation and use by ancient authors and in writings from antiquity through the Middle Ages. This consists not only of contributions that deal with the Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and Latin textual witnesses, but also those that engage evidence in Ugaritic, Arabic, Syriac, Ethiopic, Coptic, Armenian, and other linguistic traditions. A wide variety of additional issues related to textual criticism are also addressed, including epigraphy, manuscript studies, papyrology, codicology, paleography, scribal habits and the production of texts, the history of transmission (and its cultural, social, and religious settings), the practice of textual criticism from antiquity to modern times, restoration and conservation, the use of modern technology in studying this material, the production of critical editions, and discussions of particular passages.

Writings (including Psalms)

Donald R. Vance
Description: The aim of the unit to promote all aspects of and approaches to the study of the texts commonly referred to as the Writings (Ketuvim) in the Hebrew Bible.

Call for papers: We invite papers on topics concerning any work of the Writings, including the Psalms. While there is no overall theme for this year, we wish to continue our fruitful discussion begun in Amsterdam concerning meter (or lack thereof) and other scansion methodologies in Hebrew poetry. We also want to build on the discussion of the composition of the Psalter begun last year as well. The bulk of the papers in our unit are actually on the other works in the Writings and we encourage papers on wisdom, apocalyptic, historiography in Chronicles/Ezra-Nehemiah, etc.
 
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